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Information on Road Tax/SORN/Registration of New Vehicles


You’re learning to drive and you’ve got a car (or you’re about to buy one), but how do you go about taxing it? Well, the DVLA will automatically send you a tax disc reminder (V11 form). To be able to buy a new tax disc for your car, you will need to go to the Post Office.

The forms you will need to take with you are as follows:

1) An original copy of a valid insurance certificate, it must not be a photocopy;
2) A original copy of a valid Vehicle Test Certificate (your reminder will tell you if this is required);
3) If you have a disability you’ll need to take an original copy of a valid Exempt Certificate.

If the DVLA send you a V85/1 form, you must apply for a renewal at your local DVLA office.

What if I’ve lost the reminder, or if I’ve had a break in my licence, or if the vehicle has a new keeper? You will need to take the following documents with you when visiting a Post Office that issues documents for a motor vehicle:


1) The registration document (V5C) or the tear-off portion (V5C/2): Please note that the V5C2 can only be used within 8 weeks of you purchasing a vehicle;
2) An original copy of a valid insurance certificate, it must not be a photocopy;
3) A original copy of a valid Vehicle Test Certificate (your reminder will tell you if this is required);
4) If you have a disability you’ll need to take an original copy of a valid Exempt Certificate.

The Post Office accepts payments by credit/debit cards, cheques or cash.

How much will it cost me to tax my car?
The price you pay is dependent upon the type of car you drive; this is what is called the Vehicle Excise Duty (VED).

If your car was registered before 1 March 2001, the VED you pay will be according to the size of the engine. However, if your car was registered after 1 March 2001, the VED you pay will depend on the carbon dioxide emissions (CO2) and the type of fuel it uses.

The tables below will give you an indication of what you can expect to pay. The tables contain the rates of vehicle tax for the different tax classes, together with tax class (TC) codes to distinguish them.
The rates shown apply to tax discs taken out from 13 March 2008.

Cars registered before 1 March 2001 (based on engine size)
Private/light goods (TC11)
Engine size (cc) 12 months rate 6 months rate
Not over 1549 £120.00 £66.00
Over 1549 £185.00 £101.75
Cars registered on or after 1 March 2001 (based on fuel type and CO2 emissions)
The rates shown only apply to cars that have been type approved in category M1 and registered on the basis of CO2 emissions measured in grams per kilometre (g/km) driven. These details are shown on the Registration Certificate.
Petrol car (TC48) and diesel car (TC49)
Band CO2 emission (g/km) 12 months rate 6 months rate
A Up to 100 Not applicable Not applicable
B 101-120 £35.00 Not applicable
C 121-150 £120.00 £66.00
D 151-165 £145.00 £79.75
E 166-185 £170.00 £93.50
F Over 185 £210.00 £115.50
G Over 225 – for cars registered on or after 23/03/06 £400.00 £220.00
Alternative fuel car (TC59)
Band CO2 emission (g/km) 12 months rate 6 months rate
A Up to 100 Not applicable Not applicable
B 101-120 £15.00 Not applicable
C 121-150 £100.00 £55.00
D 151-165 £125.00 £68.75
E 166-185 £150.00 £82.50
F Over 185 £195.00 £107.25
G Over 225 – for cars registered on or after 23/03/06 £385.00 £211.75

Light goods vehicles (TC39)
Registered on or after 1 March 2001 (not over 3,500kg revenue weight).
Vehicle 12 months rate 6 months rate
Light goods vehicle £180.00 £99.00
Euro 4 light goods vehicles (TC36)
Registered between 1 March 2003 and 31 December 2006 only (not over 3,500kg revenue weight).
Vehicle 12 months rate 6 months rate
Euro 4 light goods vehicles £120.00 £66.00
• Please note, the new Euro 5 vehicle tax rate will be introduced from 1 January 2009

Motorcycle (with or without a sidecar) (TC17)
Engine size (cc) 12 months rate 6 months rate
Not over 150 £15.00 Not applicable
151-400 £33.00 Not applicable
401-600 £48.00 Not applicable
Over 600 £66.00 £36.30

The best way to reduce your road tax is to buy a car that produces fewer CO2 emissions. If you buy a diesel-engined car, it can reduce your bill as they produce lower CO2 emissions than their petrol equivalents. However, if it is a company car, it will attract a 3% extra levy.

Should I buy an Automatic or Manual?
The answer to this question is down to personal choice. However, be aware that automatics are very fuel-thirsty. They also have higher CO2 emissions. So you’ll end up being charged more in fuel and road tax. Manual cars are more economic to run and save on road tax.

For more information go to:
www.direct.gov.uk

SORN – What does it mean?
SORN stands for Statutory Off Road Notification. Basically, if you’re not going to re-licence your car, for example if you’re not going to be using it, or if you’re going to keep it off public roads, you need to tell the DVLA. Not only is it a legal requirement but it will also save you money. After all, if you’re not using your car, why pay road tax for it?

To declare SORN, you’ll need to tick the SORN declaration box on your V11 tax disc reminder form and then take it to the Post Office. You can also do this online; you will just need to give the reference number from your V11 form. If you’d prefer to do it over the phone, you can do so by calling 0870 850 4444.

To make a SORN declaration, it must be done from the fifth day of the month that your tax is due to run out. For example, if your vehicle tax is due 31 January 2009, you must declare SORN from 5 January 2009. SORN cannot be backdated, so the sooner you do it, the better. You should hear from the DVLA within two weeks after you’ve declared SORN, although if you don’t, you will need to contact the DVLA Customer Enquiries department.

Registering a New Vehicle – how do I do it and what identification will I need?
When registering a vehicle for the first time, you will need to visit your local DVLA office. You’ll need to take some identification of who you are and where you live. This is so you can prove the keepers name and address details at the time of registration are genuine. This is to help the DVLA combat fraudulent vehicle registrations. The form you will receive is V55/4: application for a first licence for a new motor vehicle and declaration for registration.

Identification you will need is one of the following:
1) Your current photocard driving licence, or one original document which confirms your name;
2) UK or EU Passport;
3) Birth Certificate;
4) Marriage Certificate;
5) Decree Nisi or Absolute.

You will also need to take one of the following:
1) A utility bill (gas, water, electric bill) from the last 3 months;
2) A bank or building society statement from the last 3 months;
3) A Council Tax bill;
4) Medical Card.

You will also need to take all of the following:
1) A current vehicle insurance certificate;
2) The cost of the vehicle tax;
3) The registration fee of £55, if necessary;
4) Any other documents relating to the vehicle;
5) A valid MOT Certificate, if necessary;
6) Evidence of type approval, single vehicle approval (SVA);
7) Declaration of newness, if necessary;
8) Appropriate HM Revenue and Customs form.

If your car is imported then you will need to show the foreign registration document and take any other paperwork relating to the vehicle. You will also need to have evidence to show the date when you collected the vehicle.

For more information, contact your local DVLA office.

What will happen if I don’t tax/SORN my vehicle?
YOU WILL GET FOUND OUT! The DVLA carry out monthly checks on its records to identify untaxed vehicles. Police also carry out spot checks. If you get caught, the following will/may happen:
• you will receive an automatic fine of £80 as well as having to pay for a new tax disc including any arrears you owe;
• you may be fined a minimum of £1000 and get a County Court Judgement against you

If you declare SORN, but carry on using your vehicle (or keeping it on a public road)
• you may receive a fine of £5000 and get 2 years imprisonment;
• your vehicle may get clamped. Not only will you have to pay to release your vehicle, you will have to produce a valid tax disc or pay a surety fee if you do not have a tax disc available;
• your vehicle may be impounded and you will receive a fee for your vehicle being in storage. If you fail to pay the release or storage fee, your vehicle may be crushed or sold.

Therefore, the cost of taxing your vehicle is a lot less than you would have to pay if you’re caught without a valid tax disc!